ECP Total Number of Registered Voters in Pakistan

ECP Total Number of Registered Voters in Pakistan 2018 Punjab, KPK, Balochistan, Sindh, Fata, Gilgit Baltistan, AJK, Federal Capital complete list of Male, Female, Married, Un-married, Young, First Time Vote Casters, Muslim, Non-Muslim, Minorities, Age wise official source report updated here. Please remember one thing that General Elections 2018 will be held on 25th July and Election Commission of Pakistan manage these reports after final censuses.

Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) on Thursday announced that the total number of registered voters in the country has reached the figure of 104,267,581 — with 58,463,228 male and 45,804,353 female voters.

According to the latest statistics, the gap between male and female voters has increased, amounting to 12,658,875.

Preliminary electoral rolls-2018 shared by the ECP reveal that out of the total registered voters 59,740,095 voters are from Punjab, 22,066,558 from Sindh, 15,239,571 from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 4,194,311 from Balochistan, 2,296,849 from Fata and 730,197 voters are from the federal capital.

The commission said that in Punjab, male voters are 33,294,012 while female voters are 26,446,083. In Sindh, male voters are 12,275,322 while female voters are 9,791,236.

In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, male voters are 8,690,376 while female voters are 6,549,195. In Balochistan, the male voters are 2,428,370 while the female voters are 1,765,941.

In Fata, male voters are 1,386,032 while female voters are 910,817. In the federal capital, male voters are 389,116 while female voters are 341,081.

ECP Total Number of Registered Voters in Pakistan 2018 Official

Number of non-Muslim voters in Pakistan shows rise of over 30pc:

Pakistan ECP Total Registered Voters Number in All provinces, states details. The number of voters belonging to religious minorities in the country has climbed to 3.63 million from 2.77m registered in electoral rolls for the 2013 general elections — registering an increase of 0.860m or 30 per cent in five years.

According to the latest official document available with Dawn, Hindu voters continue to maintain their majority among the minorities, but they no more constitute over half of total non-Muslim voters as was the case in 2013.

The number of Hindu voters before 2013 polls was 1.40m while total number of voters of minority communities was 2.77m — the former being higher than the collective number of all other minorities. The number of Hindu voters now stands at 1.77m. They are mostly concentrated in Sindh where in two districts they form over 40 per cent of total registered voters.

Document makes no mention of Jewish voters, although in 2013 there were 809 of them

Christians form the second largest group of non-Muslim voters, totalling 1.64m with over 1m settled in Punjab followed by over 200,000 in Sindh. Their number has grown at a relatively high pace as compared to Hindu voters as it was 1.23m before 2013 general polls.

The total number of Ahmadi voters is 167,505 — most of whom dwell in Punjab, followed by Sindh and Islamabad. The number in 2013 stood at 115,966.

Of the total 8,852 Sikh voters, most are settled in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa followed by Sindh and Punjab. Their presence in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas is more than their combined strength in Balochistan and Islamabad. They numbered 5,934 in 2013.

The number of Parsi voters has grown from 3,650 in 2013 to 4,235. Majority of them is settled in Sindh followed by KP. The number of Buddhist voters has increased from 1,452 in 2013 to 1,884. Most of them live in Sindh and Punjab.

There are a total of 31,543 voters from the Bahai community on the electoral rolls.

The document obtained by Dawn makes no mention of Jewish voters in Pakistan, though in 2013 there were 809 Jewish voters in the country — 427 women and 382 men.

While the district-wise data of non-Muslim voters is yet to be prepared, according to official statistics related to 2013 elections, Umerkot and Tharparkar districts in Sindh had as high percentage as 49pc and 46pc of total voters, respectively. In Umerkot, there were a total of 386,924 voters of whom 189,501 belonged to religious minorities. In Tharparkar, out of a total of 473,189 voters, 219,342 were non-Muslim.

In Mirpurkhas, the total number of voters was 590,035 and among them 192,357 (33pc) were non-Muslim. In Tando Allahyar, 74,954 non-Muslims constituted 26pc of total 288,460 voters.

In Tando Mohammad Khan, 39,847 non-Muslims accounted for 17pc of total 231,522 voters. In Matiari, 81,589 non-Muslims constituted 13pc of total 302,265 voters. In Karachi’s South district, total number of voters was 1,070,321 and among them 81,589 (8pc) were non-Muslim. In Ghotki and Hyderabad, 41,031 and 62,243 non-Muslims accounted for 7pc of total 571,636 and 928,236 voters, respectively.

In Chiniot and Lahore districts of Punjab, 35,335 and 247,827 non-Muslims constituted 6pc of total 604,991 and 4,424,314 voters, respectively.

In Jamshoro and Kashmore districts of Sindh, 18,912 and 17,495 non-Muslims were 5pc of total 373,097 and 355,904 voters, respectively.ECP Total Number of Registered Voters in Pakistan

Around 46m young voters set to play key role in polls:

Close to 46 million young voters are expected to play a pivotal role in determining the outcome of the general elections expected later this year.

Analysts believe the huge number of young voters — a majority of whom use social media — could not only influence the electorate using propaganda tools on online platforms, but even alter the electoral scene in several constituencies if they turn out in large numbers on election day.

Ramsha Jahangir

According to age-wise data collated by official sources, exclusively available with Dawn, there are 17.44m voters between the ages 18 and 25; the number of voters between the ages 26 and 35 years is 28.99m; while there are 22.48m voters between the ages 36 and 45 years.

The voters in the age bracket between 18 years and 35 years are described as young voters.

This group in the age brackets of 18-25 and 26-35 forms 43.82pc of total voters

Of the 17.44m voters under 25 years old, 10.13m are in Punjab, 3.11m are in Sindh, 2.77m are in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), 0.774m are in Balochistan, 0.558m reside in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and 0.117m are from the federal capital.

Of the 28.99m voters between the ages 26 and 35 years, 16.09m are from Punjab, 6.17m are from Sindh, 4.49m hail from KP, 1.23m are in Balochistan, 0.776m hail from Fata and 0.208m are from the federal capital.

The breakdown of voters between the ages of 36 and 45 shows that 12.83m of them are from the Punjab, 5.13m hail from Sindh, 3m are from KP, 0.884m are from Balochistan, 0.466m are from Fata and 0.156m are from the federal capital.

There are 16.13m voters in the age group of 45-55 years, of which 9.38m hail from Punjab, 3.53m are from Sindh, 2.13m are from KP, 0.634m are from Balochistan, 0.325m are from Fata, and 0.119m voters are from the federal capital.

Of the 10.28m voters between ages 56 and 66 years, 6.30m are from the Punjab, 2.17m are from Sindh, 1.49m are from KP, 0.396m are from Balochistan, 0.218m hail from Fata, and 84,312 are from the federal capital.

As many as 10.61m voters in the country are over 66 years old, of whom 6.3m are from Punjab, 2.17m are from Sindh, 1.49m are from KP, 0.401m are from Balochistan, 0.165m are from Fata and 80,228 are from the federal capital.

In the electoral rolls prepared for the 2013 general polls, the total number of voters was 86.18m, of which 17.5m voters were under 25 years of age, while 24.2m voters were between 26 and 35 years old, 17.2m were between 36 and 45 years old, 12m voters were between 46 and 55 years old, 8.4m voters were in the age bracket of 56 to 65 years, while 6.7m voters were above 66 years of age.

Minorities’ vote bank reaches close to 3m:

The vote bank of religious minorities has widened to reach close to three million, with 13 districts in Sindh and two in Punjab having significant presence of minorities placing them in a position to alter the electoral scene in many constituencies.

According to a document of the Election Commission of Pakistan available with Dawn, the number of minority vote stands at 2.99 million — up from 2.77m which was the case before the 2013 general elections.

Hindu voters have a dominating majority among all the minority communities with their number (1.49m) constituting half of the total non-Muslim voters in the country. They are mostly concentrated in Sindh where their number comes to over 1.39m. A total of 73,152 Hindu voters live in Punjab, 22,766 in Balochistan, 4,022 in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 586 in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata) and 188 in the Islamabad Capital Territory.

With over 1.49m voters Hindus top the list

Christians form the second largest non-Muslim voters, totalling 1.32m with over 1m settled in Punjab followed by 209,083 in Sindh, 29,173 in Islamabad, 26,814 in KP, 16,279 in Balochistan and 1,345 in Fata.

The total number of Ahmadi voters in Pakistan is 119,749 of which 101,156 are dwelling in Punjab, 14,855 in Sindh, 2,134 in Islamabad, 1,140 in KP, 451 in Balochistan and 13 in Fata.

Of the total 6,193 Sikh voters, 2,597 live in KP, 1,477 in Sindh, 1,157 in Punjab, 730 in Fata, 225 in Balochistan and seven in Islamabad.

Of the total 3,743 Parsi voters, 2,487 are from Sindh, 723 belong to KP, 254 to Punjab, 250 to Balochistan, 16 to Fata and 13 to Islamabad.

There are 1,643 Buddhist voters and most live in Sindh and Punjab.

Among other religious communities, around 900 are Jews.

According to official statistics obtained before the 2013 elections, there were 2.77m non-Muslim voters in the country. The data showed that Umerkot and Tharparkar districts in Sindh had as high as 49 per cent and 46pc non-Muslim voters, respectively. In Umerkot, there were a total of 386,924 voters of which 189,501 belonged to the religious minorities. In Tharparkar, out of a total of 473,189 voters, 219,342 were non-Muslim.

In Mirpurkhas, the total number of voters was 590,035 and among them 192,357 (33pc) were non-Muslim. In Tando Allahyar, 74,954 non-Muslims constitute 26pc of the total 288,460 voters.

In Tando Mohammad Khan, 39,847 non-Muslims accounted for 17pc of total 231,522 voters. In Matiari, 81,589 non-Muslims constituted 13pc of total 302,265 voters. In Karachi (south), total number of voters was 1,070,321 and among them 81,589 (8pc) were non-Muslim. In Ghotki and Hyderabad, 41,031 and 62,243 non-Muslims accounted for 7pc of the total 571,636 and 928,236 voters, respectively.

In Chiniot and Lahore districts of Punjab, 35,335 and 247,827 non-Muslims constituted 6pc of the total 604,991 and 4,424,314 voters, respectively. In Jamshoro and Kashmore districts of Sindh, 18,912 and 17,495 non-Muslims were 5pc of the total 373,097 and 355,904 voters, respectively.

Among 2.77m non-Muslim voters registered before the 2013 polls, 1.40m were Hindus, 1.23m Christians, 115,966 Ahmadis, 5,934 Sikhs, 3,650 Parsis, 1,452 Buddhists and 809 Jews. Jews and Parsis were two minorities in which the number of women voters was higher than that of men. There were 1,915 Parsi female voters against 1,735 male voters. Likewise, the number of Jewish women voters was 427 against 382 men in the community.

Number of minorities’ voters

  • Hindu 1,498,275
  • Christian 1,325,433
  • Ahmadi 119,749
  • Sikh 6,193
  • Parsi 3,743
  • Buddhist 1,643
  • Other communities 42,805
  • Total 2,997,841(Source, Dawn.com)

If we missed any thing then must mention in comments section below.

No comments.

Leave a Reply

error: Content is protected !!